Highest Vermont CD (Certificate of Deposit) Rates

Certificate of Deposit has certain types of rates that remain to confuse customers. How do we compute VT-Vertmont CD (certificate of deposit) rates? What's the difference between APR and APY? Find it all here. This article will teach you to compute for yourself so that you do not simply accept what the bank is telling. If you have a personal understanding of how it works and how to compute, then the banks will only be too happy they have a smart customer.

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A Closer Look at Vermont CD (Certificate of Deposit) Rates

Certificates of deposit are time deposits offered by banks and credit unions. You might not be aware of this type of account but if you check your local bank, you might be seeing a list of CDs as part of its products. So how do they work?

A Certificate of Deposit is not an actual paper certificate. It is an investment vehicle that allows the depositor to earn interest while keeping his or her funds in a bank or a credit union. You can avail of this account in banks, both online and traditional, and choose among their variety of CD types. Certificates of deposit also vary in terms or maturity dates. You can invest on a CD with a term of thirty days, six months and others which can extend up to ten years. Each term CD has its own Vermont CD (certificate of deposit) rate. The shorter the term is, the lower the rate will be. So if you invest on a ten year certificate of deposit, your Vermont CD (certificate of deposit) rate would be high.

Vermont CD (certificate of deposit) rates are higher than the typical savings account rates and money market rates. When you check the rates of the banks and credit unions, you might be seeing two sets of rates: the APY and the APR. APY or the annual percentage yield is the compounded interest rate of your earnings. It implements the time element in which the previous interests also earn interest. APR is simply the rate that the banks will apply to your account. For instance, you have a CD with an APY of 0.96% and an APR of 0.95%. The APR is already a given and there is no need to compute that, thus the rate stays 0.96%. To compute APY, the variables APR and the periods are required. The results would usually create a higher outcome than the APR. That's because in APR, the interest earned also earns interest.

So how do we compute the APY? Here is the formula. APY = (1 + r/n )n - 1.

That looks so technical, right? Let's put the formula into a story. Investor A wants to know the APY of a 12 month CD with an APR of 0.96%. The interest is compounded quarterly. What's the APY?

The variables r and n are the APR and number of periods per year that would be compounded, respectively. The rate is divided by the n or 4. How did I get 4? Since the interest is compounded quarterly, it also means that in one year, the interest is compounded every three months, thus twelve months divided by three months is 4 times. Rate quarterly of 0.24% (0.96%/4) added to 1 is 1.0024. Using 4 as the exponent, (1.0024)4 will be produced. So what's the story behind this? The whole number 1 means 100% while the 0.24% is the percentage of the 100% that will be compounded. The 1.0024 means that there is an increase of 0.24% every compounding. Furthermore, the exponent of 4 states that the increase of 0.24% is done four times. The resulting figure will be 1.0096. Finally, you have to deduct the 1 from the result to obtain the increase in earnings using the formula. The resulting figure will be a Vermont CD (certificate of deposit) rate of 0.009634 or 0.96%.

CD Rates by State:

ONLINE SAVINGS ACCOUNT

  • No minimum balance
  • Competitive rates, No risk

MONEY MARKET ACCOUNT

  • High rates, Access to money
  • FDIC Insured

CD Types


CDs Overnight Averages

Product
Yield
+/-
Last week


3 Mo CD
0.11
-
0.11


6 Mo CD
0.17
-
0.17


1 Yr CD
0.26
-
0.26


1.5 Yr CD
0.33
-
0.33


5 Yr CD
1.02
-
1.02


CDs Guides